A Well Balenced Diet of Teaching

 Three services (Sun. AM, PM and Wed. PM) give an opportunity for variety but a Pastor must be careful not to develop monotony in the pulpit or to teach much with very little sinking in. Here is my philosophy on developing a steady diet of teaching for a Church:

  1. Sunday AMs – Sunday morning is Super Bowl Sunday for most Churches. You have the highest attendance of both saved and lost people. I put the majority of my study into developing the Sunday morning message. I also try to preach within my strongest gifts on Sunday morning. I have always preached my best out of a narrative (A book of the Bible that tells a story for example, Genesis, Exodus, Ruth, Matthew, Acts). So most of my sermon series on Sunday morning come out of narratives. I will also do an occasional topical study to address issues in the World, Church or community, for example my first series with be a study on the God centered family.
  2. Sunday PMs –I try to bring balance to the AM teaching on Sunday nights. If I preach narrative of Sunday morning I will typically preach epistle on Sunday night. This is normally a more technical, bare bones study of the scripture, less illustrated but more information on the language, context, author, audience, ect.
  3. Wednesday PMs – Wednesday is one of my favorite services because it allows for more interaction with the congregation. Typically I teach systematic theology on Wed. nights. Systematic Theology starts with answering BIG questions like, “Who is God?”, “Has God Spoken?” and goes all the way to developing biblical beliefs about life and conduct. But the thing that makes Wed. nights really cool is that we open the floor for questions about the topic. Q and A was a regular part of our Lord’s ministry and I have found that people grow tremendously during this Wed. night dialogue.

Varying you approach to teaching both in style and subject develops a well balanced diet for a local Church and helps to keep things fresh for the congregation.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

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